Supporting BCVRE Study Guide Chapter 1 Brocade Vyatta vRouter for Virtualization

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Supporting BCVRE Study Guide Chapter 1 Brocade Vyatta vRouter for Virtualization
Supporting BCVRE Study Guide Chapter 1 Brocade Vyatta vRouter for Virtualization

Objectives: As a Brocade Certified vRouter Engineer, you must be able to demonstrate the ability to install, configure and troubleshoot features of Brocade Vyatta Network OS.

Target: This course is for anyone tasked with configuring or managing the Brocade Vyatta vRouter. This course also for those who are preparing to take the BCVRE Certification Exam.

Bacaan Lainnya

Course prerequisites: Before taking these bundled courses, students should have basic IT networking experience, including working knowledge of TCP/IP.

BCVRE Bootcamp Syllabus

Agenda:

  • Brocade Vyatta vRouter for Virtualization
  • Installing Using the Vyatta Virt ISO
  • Describe show command usage and output
  • Identify key CLI operations
  • Describe the commit and save processes
  • vRouter initial configuration

Brocade Vyatta vRouter for Virtualization

Different Types Of Cloud Computing

Different Types Of Cloud Computing
Different Types Of Cloud Computing

Types of Clouds / Service Models

Types of Clouds / Service Models
Types of Clouds / Service Models

Cloud Services Taxonomy

Cloud Services Taxonomy
Cloud Services Taxonomy

Physical Infrastructure

Physical Infrastructure
Physical Infrastructure

Virtual Infrastructure

Virtual Infrastructure
Virtual Infrastructure

Physical and Virtual Architecture

Physical and Virtual Architecture
Physical and Virtual Architecture

Why Use Virtual Machines?

Why Use Virtual Machines?
Why Use Virtual Machines?

Brocade Vyatta vRouter for Virtualization

Brocade Vyatta vRouter for Virtualization
Brocade Vyatta vRouter for Virtualization

Provides advanced routing and security services for physical, virtual, and cloud networking environments.

Is optimized for multicore x86 processing power, common hypervisor platforms, and emerging cloud architectures.

Provides the industry’s only cloudready and performance-optimized VMs, bundling firewall, VPN, advanced routing, and cloud bridging for secure multitenant cloud service delivery.

Simplifies network management with the Brocade Vyatta Remote Access API

VYATTA IN AMAZON VPC AND EC2

Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (VPC) allows you to create a private network that resembles a traditional network except that it is hosted in the Amazon Web Services Cloud (AWS). Vyatta can provide Internet connectivity using Amazon’s Elastic Public IP address.

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VYATTA IN AMAZON VPC AND EC2
VYATTA IN AMAZON VPC AND EC2

Installing Using the Vyatta Virt ISO

To install on VMware ESX/ESXi

  • Create a GNU/Linux 6 (32-bit) or (64-bit) virtual machine.
  • Download the virt ISO to a location that’s accessible from the newly-created virtual machine. can obtain the latest virt ISO from https://my.vmware.com/web/vmware/downloads/info/slug/datacenter_cloud_infrastructure/vmware_vsphere/6_5.
  • Point the DVD drive on the virtual machine to the downloaded Vyatta virt ISO.
  • Set up the virtual machine so that it will boot from DVD.
  • Reboot the virtual machine. The virtual machine boots the Vyatta ISO.
  • At the Vyatta command line, issue the install image command and follow the prompts to install the system.
  • When the install process has completed, power down the system using the poweroff command.
  • Reset the virtual DVD so that it no longer points to the ISO.
  • Start the virtual machine.
  • Test the installation.

Verify the Release and System Type

To verify the release and system type

  • Login as user vyatta. Use the default password (vyatta) unless you have changed it.
  • Run the show version command.
    • The Version: line shows the version number of the running system. Make sure the Version: line shows the version you expect.
    • The System Type: line shows the type of hardware the system is running on and whether it is in a virtual environment. Make sure the System Type: line shows the information you expect.
    • The Boot via: line shows the type of system that is running. Make sure the Boot via: line shows the correct system type.
      • livecd — The system is running from a LiveCD.
      • image — The system is running as an image-based system.
      • disk — The system is running as a disk-based system.

Verify the Release and System Type

Describe show command usage and output

Show Commands

To determine who has been accessing your vRouter, and from what location, use the command show system login users.

To display disk utilization on your vRouter, use the command show system storage.

To display system memory utilization on your vRouter, use the command show system memory.

Identify key CLI operations

Command prompts

Command prompts
Command prompts

Command Completion

Command Completion
Command Completion

CLI Command Modes

CLI Command Modes
CLI Command Modes

Show Commands

To display information about the software version, use the command show version. Note the differences in output between a bare metal installation and a virtual installation.

CLI Command Modes

Operational mode: In this mode, you can issue show commands to examine system and feature operations, view and clear statistical counters, reset connections, and reboot the vRouter device. Both device operators and administrators can access perational mode commands.

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Configuration mode: In this mode, you can issue set commands to enable or alter system operations. You can view the current configuration with show commands. You can also issue operational mode commands by using the
keyword run followed by the operational mode command. Configuration mode can only be accessed by device administrators.

Command History

The Vyatta system shell supports a command history, where commands you execute are stored in an internal buffer and can be re-executed or edited.

Command History
Command History

Editing Command

Command Editing
Command Editing

Filtering Command Output

Filtering Command Output
Filtering Command Output

Describe the commit and save processes

Terminology

Several versions of system configuration information
exist on the system at a given time:

  • Active or “running” configuration. This is the configuration that is actually loaded and being used by the system.
  • Working configuration. When you enter configuration mode and make configuration changes, changes remain in working configuration until you commit the changes, at which time the configuration becomes active or running.
  • Saved or “boot” configuration. If you save configuration (using the save command), it is saved to the file config.boot in the /config directory of the local system. When you reboot, the system reads and loads the configuration from config.boot.

CLI configuration states

CLI configuration states
CLI configuration states

Commands for navigating in configuration mode

Commands for navigating in configuration mode
Commands for navigating in configuration mode

Adding or Modifying Configuration

Add new configuration by creating a configuration node, using the set command in configuration mode. Modify existing configuration using the set command in configuration mode, as in the following example.

Deleting Configuration

Use the delete command to delete a configuration statement or a complete configuration node, as in the following example.

Committing Configuration Changes

In the Vyatta system, configuration changes do not take effect until you commit them using the commit command.

Discarding Configuration Changes

You cannot exit from configuration mode with uncommitted configuration changes; you must either commit the changes or discard them. If you don’t want to commit the changes, you can discard them using the exit discard command.

Cloning a Configuration Node

To save time entering information, you can copy, or clone, a configuration multi-node.

Renaming a Configuration Node

One thing you can’t do with the set command is change the identifier of a node for which there can be multiple instances (a “multi-node”), such as a
DNS server or an IP address for an interface. However, if a multi-node has an incorrect identifier, you can change the identifier using the rename command.

Adding Comments to a Configuration Node

In complicated configurations, it can be helpful to add comments to help you remember or help another person understand what a particular configuration does. The Vyatta system allows you to annotate your configuration using the comment command.

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Deleting Comments from a Configuration Node

To remove a comment using the comment command, specify the configuration node and an empty string, as in the following example.

Saving the Running Configuration

Save the running configuration using the save command in configuration mode. By default, configuration is saved to the file config.boot in the standard configuration directory.

You can save configuration to a different location by specifying a different file name.

Loading a Saved Configuration

To load a previously saved configuration, use the load command in configuration mode. By default, the system reads the file from the standard configuration directory.

Merging Saved and Running Configurations

  • You can merge a saved configuration with the active (running) configuration using the merge command.
  • The process of merging adds new configuration entries and applies any modifications to existing active entries to produce a new working configuration. This merged configuration must be committed before it becomes the active configuration.

Archiving Configuration Versions on Commit

  • The system automatically archives the configuration whenever you commit a configuration change. New committed configuration version is saved to config.boot in /config. The old config.boot file is saved to the /config/archive directory under the name config.boot.timestamp, where timestamp is the time the file was saved in the format YYYY-MM-DDhhmmss.
  • By default, the system maintains 20 versions of configuration in the archive. You can change the number of versions maintained in the archive using the system configmanagement commit-revisions command.

Rolling Back to a Previous Version

You can roll back system configuration to any archived version using the rollback command. To see the list of configuration file revisions available,
use the show system commit operational mode command.

Comparing Configuration Versions

You can compare two versions of configuration using the show system commit and compare commands.

Cloning Configuration Across System Images

You can copy the /config directory from one image to another using the clone system config command.

Reset Configuration

Factory Reset Vyatta

vRouter initial configuration

Initial Configuration

  • Host Name
  • Domain
  • IP Address
  • Default Gateway
  • Aliases
  • Configuring DNS
  • Configuring Date and Time

Sample Topology

Sample Topology
Sample Topology

R1 Configuration

R2 Configuration

Verify Interface R1

Verify Connection

The End of The Word

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